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: cindy, thank you for your comment. bob is next from massachusetts. independent line. my comment is pretty much the same as the last woman's. i think the president is making the biggest mistake that we will ever hear. he can't give these people a right to keep all that stuff. they will nuke israel. there is no doubt. he will nuke israel and i bet you it will happen inside of six months. i'm sorry. have a nice day. host: mike is joining us from washington state. caller: good morning, mike. i am an iraq veteran. those to say this, countries don't care about us and they don't care about israel. ist is their whole mission to destroy israel. when people are saying that they should not be -- that they should be allowed to enrich nuclear program, what we should not be -- we should not be dealing with terrorists at all. as with what these people do. israel has been having dumped on for centuries. i am an irish italian catholic and i support israel. i don't have the same religious views, but i completely support israel. we need to stand by israel. there are christian sites in israel that
for massachusetts. we will also take your calls, e- mails and tweets. andy look at today's news. and a look at today's news. ♪ >> good morning, it is the "washington journal" for november 19. president obama will meet with the select senate legionnair les today. several stories in the paper talk about the status of those discussions. president obama will also sit down for an hour long interview with wall street journals gerald side. that at c-span.org. it is the 150th anniversary of the gettysburg address. government of the people by the people and for the people that shall not perish from the earth. on this anniversary we want to get your thoughts not only on the speeches that were told that end, but what it means for our country today. here's how you can do so -- >> if you want to give us your thoughts on the gettysburg address via twitter you can do so. as always, you can e-mail us at span.org. >> i hear some of the speech that was delivered back on november 19, 1863. it is by president lincoln. it is rather frustrated dedicated to the great task remaining before us that we take increased devot
of the open enrollment period 106,000 or 1.4% of consumers are going to sign up. if you look at massachusetts, during its first month -- and, mr. president, i'm sure you're aware of this, being in new jersey, close to massachusetts, only 0.3%, or 123 people signed up for coverage out of the 36er,000 who ultimately signed up in the first year. so let's be clear. we all wanted to see bigger numbers, but the affordable care act numbers are four times better than what massachusetts did in its first month. if you talk to the people of massachusetts, they love their health care plan. and our plan is based on their plan. by the way, a republican plan. hundreds of thousands have started the enrollment proficiency and i'll onprocess,. i'm going to go shopping and buy my plafnlt but i'm taking my time because i have some time -- until december. i am going to discuss it with my husband. we're going to decide what's best for us. i'm going to sign up. you know, i think it was the secretary sebelius who said, this isn't like buying a toaster. this is a commitment for a year, and you've got to take your tim
from massachusetts, ms. tsongas. ms. tsongas: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: without objection the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. shuster is recognized for one minute. mr. shuster: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to introduce a good friend and community leader in my home state, reverend paul taylor and thank him for offering today's invocation. he made the trip to the nation's capital from the city of letreau, pennsylvania. for the past 17 years, reverend taylor has dedicated his life to the students and faculty at st. vincent's college. he's held several positions there, dean of admissions, dean of students and executive vice president. his civic engagement and enthusiasm for improving the lives of o's is not limited to higher education he also serves on the board to have directors for the hospital charity foundation. in his personal life he's an avid hunter and served as super to the six-time bowl champio
always assumed that, based on massachusetts' experience, the initial sign up will be very slow. and in fact, no payments have to be made until december 15 for coverage on january 1. so, while we don't like the problems we had in october and fixing it in november, we do not think it will impact the timeline because we have a six- month enrollment, so we still have four months left and individuals can apply up until march. >> thank you. thank you, mr. chairman. >> now to senator robert. -- senator roberts. senator robert? >> thank you, mr. chairman. 'm going to focus, if i can, on the concerns raised by senator isakson, alexander, and the chairman, on security and privacy. we have a law, the federal information security management .ct, his mother --fisma everything has to have an acronym. it requires each agency to a point a chief security officer to ensure americans private financial and identifying information is protected. and that is a big issue. secretary civilians revealed last week exchanges operating on temporary authority to operate. there is a 2012 12 memo from zyonts,
accused of killing a popular teacher in massachusetts is also charged with raping her now. we are learning a lot more from documents that the court has now released today. police say they found a note alongside this young teacher's body. we'll tell you what it said. you've known? we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who's lived well into their 90s. and that's a great thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn't changed much is the official retirement age. ♪ the question is how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years. ♪ >> virginia state senator creigh deeds left the hospital three days after surviving a stabbing a parentally at the hands o of his son, and soon after he left the hospital he tweeted, i am alive so i must live. some wounds won't heal. your prayers and friendship are important to me. on tuesday, investigators say senator deeds got into some sort of altercation with his 24-year-old son, gus deeds. police say the son apparently stabbed his father several times and then s
. it's got to be better. and it will be. take a look at that experience in massachusetts. the senator from california talked about that earlier. during the first month of enrollment in massachusetts, 123 people signed up. in the first 30 days. by the end of the year, though, 36,000 had signed up. the number of uninsured young people went from 25% to 10% within three years. massachusetts today, because of the leadership of governor mitt romney and the cooperation of the democratic legislature in that state, has nearly universal health insurance coverage. however the roll-out wasn't without some problems, just as ours s. thours is. the current governor said there were a series of web site problems. he also said the web site was a work in progress for the first few years. there were outages during peak times and problems searching for providers. i recently met with a doctor from boston. he's one of the best. he said, people in massachusetts can't remember what it was like before. they can't remember what it was like before people had health insurance. this doctor is an oncologist. he dea
, and we will look at the desert bus for hope. >> and football season canceled in massachusetts. michael eaves explains why in sports ahead onal jazeera america. seriously wrong... >> there's been acrimony... >> the conservative ideal... >> it's an urgent need... and a host willing to ask the tough questions >> how do you explain it to yourself? and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story next only on al jazeera america >> when was the last time your road trip took you from tucson to las vegas. it's an eight hour journey and one that is virtual. stay with me here. but it raises real money for some really special kids. so here to tell us all about the desert bus and it's mission is alan schafler in british columbia. it's all yours. >> reporter: tony, here we go. we're talking about the desert bus for hope. we'll pan to the right. and show you who is driving right now. and there is the screen from the desert bus co-opted by a comedy troupe and their extended family and friends to create a huge fundraiser a wildly pop lay event reaching all over the world. they turned a
speakers, and senators -- the gentlelady from massachusetts and washington state. i ask unanimous consent morning business be extended for these two for approximately ten minutes. the presiding officer: is there objection? seeing no objection, the request is granted. ms. mikulski: i now yield to the gentlelady from washington state and then massachusetts. the presiding officer: the gentlelady from washington. mrs. murray: first i want to thank the senator from maryland and the senator from maine for helping to bring so many of us to the floor today to talk about an issue that really cuts across bipartisan -- cuts across partisan lines and has plagued our nation's military and has gone unaddressed for far too long. military sexual assault is an epidemic, and it is right -- it has rightly been identified as such by the pentagon. it is absolutely unconscionable that a fellow service member, the person you rely on to have your back and to be there for you would commit such a terrible crime. it is simply appalling that they could commit such a personal violation of their brother or sister in u
part of massachusetts, west virginia and kentucky were once part of virginia, and tennessee was a break away from north carolina. and, of course, much of the south seceded and called itself a separate country until it was defeated in the civil war. secessionist by tradition it is almost like thanksgiving, thanksgiving stays and secession comes and goes. >> douglas brinkley is a professor of history at rice university in houston, and a cbs news contributor. he says the founding fathers made sure rural america was listened to starting with the way we choose a president. >> that is why we have electorial college system that we don't forget rural people, but that system of having two senators from every state regardless of population is a gesture, a big one, to rural populations that they are being listened to. >> reporter: listened to or not, these modern day movements are popping up from maryland to the upper peninsula of michigan to northern colorado. >> no way, colorado we are here to stay. >> reporter: in northern colorado this tuesday, voters in 11 counties will decide about letting t
from pennsylvania, maine was once part of massachusetts, west virginia and kentucky were once part of virginia, and tennessee was a break away from north carolina. and, of course, much of the south seceded and called itself a separate country until it was defeated in the civil war. secessionist by tradition it is almost like thanksgiving, thanksgiving stays and secession comes and goes. >> douglas brinkley is a professor of history at rice university in houston, and a cbs news contributor. he says the founding fathers made sure rural america was listened to starting with the way we choose a president. >> that is why we have electorial college system that we don't forget rural people, but that system of having two senators from every state regardless of population is a gesture, a big one, to rural populations that they are being listened to. >> reporter: listened to or not, these modern day movements are popping up from maryland to the upper peninsula of michigan to northern colorado. >> no way, colorado we are here to stay. >> reporter: in northern colorado this tuesday, voters in
of this irresponsibility and the negligence of this company in massachusetts. a lawsuit was filed recently in nevada. two young boys were allegedly impacted significantly as a result of this medication that was really bad medication. unless the entire united states senate bends to that one senator's wish -- the one that voted "no" -- he will force this body to jump through hoops and work through the next several days wasting time to finish this crucial drug safety bill. but we're going to finish the bill. we're going to finish that bill. it's important for our country, and i can't let one senator dictate what goes on here in the senate. mr. president, following leader remarks, the senate will be in a period of morning business for two hours. republicans will control the first half, and the majority will control the final half. following that morning business, we will vote on the adoption of the motion to proceed to h.r. 3204, the pharmaceutical drug compounding bill. this is expected to -- i hope that in fact is the case. if thats case that is the case,e will said to what will happen subsequent to thasm
of cultural and ethnic equality broad different parts of the british isles. so you have spirited massachusetts coming anglican and virginia virginia, maryland founded by a catholic family in quaker pa., a dutch reformed york. the framers of the constitution understood this when they decreed no test for federal office and the bill of rights understood when they said congress shall make no law to establish a religion that meant no national religion but it also meant thate states could maintain their established church as the commonwealth of massachusetts and as it remained until 18303. americans have learned toe not only toa cope but prosperulu as a nation of cultural diversity but that has led to severe strains ended one case the irrepressible conflict. the first is the mass movement of lee scott irish before the american revolution they started to come over and some members in 1730 but there is a real surge after the seven years' war from the war of 1763 like earlier colonial settlers they did not come because of a mixture of religious or political reasons and so were coercion like white inden
. >> i'm a psychotherapist ins massachusetts. i have a large group practice, very busy. >> have you ever had talk show hosts on the couch? >> i have to keep that under -- >> confidentiality. >> yeah. with higher co-pays, higher deductibles, lower reimbursement rates, higher premiums what happens to client care? clients literally cannot afford the affordable health care act. so therefore they don't go for treatments and therapists have to start dropping out because the lower reimbursement rates are so awful. i'm not talking about grub hungry therapists. i'm talking b about therapists who want to keep their lights on and help people. there is a grave concern here. >> i have a friend of mine. you are raising a good point. i have a friend that's a doctor. went to -- brilliant guy. great grades in high school. got into a great college. four years of college. four years of medical school. internship, residency. you have been through it. then you have to open an office, turn on the light bill. it's a lot of money. pay back the student loans. identifying with this? now because reimbursements are
of it with your day. but i also bring greetings from massachusetts robbery which is about 5 miles north of boston. as it turns out, the population is about 55,000. when i was writing this book i least kayten by ten office space from a local architect who was a one-term rotary president. he tell them before i came well as coming to speak to one of the oldest and suddenly friendliest in wichita, may be bigger committees is keeping short. these people are on their lunch break. but i did hear an awful lot and have led to your you guys tennant the way some of those gusty. but he did not know how to keep it short. i think some of you in toward that as well. he was a faithful person for more than 50 years to when this was as club. he joined rotary in 1950, and you can usually find in here without the element is. he was out of town he often made it a point to visit with other river clubs like we had today. and around different cities in the united states. he really loved rotary, and it came clear thrall of the speeches that he had. two books and speeches that i went through. he gave an awful lot. and in
and air when you have projects of a higher decent. in this situation there massachusetts was not any significant issues >> views are not protected. >> private views are not protected. >> nicole are there any public view issues. >> it's protected but not private. >> okay. any comments? >> i think ultimately this comes to two views and as the acting da said the views are not protected. i'd make a motion to uphold >> deny the appeal. >> uphold the permit on the boos that the planning and code - >> i'm sorry what. >> don't error. >> thank you for correcting me. i'm sorry >> it's okay. >> we have a motion to uphold this permit on the basis it's code compliant. on that motion to uphold commissioner fong is absent (calling names) thank you. the vote is 4 to zero and the permit is upheld on that basis. >> no other business. okay. the meeting is hello, s lee here with activities worth buzzing about. there is much to do and see in sfrangs -- san francisco and we like to do it in the cheap. we like to enjoy the arts. join us for the korean culture festival from 11-4:00 p.m. and f
to be. i'm happy to share some of it with you today. from massachusetts rotary. it's about 5 miles north. as it turned out, the population is about 55,000. when i was writing this book i subleased a ten by ten office space from a local architect who was in fact a one-term rotary president and now signing up for a second term. he told me before i came in and told them i was coming to speak to one of the most prestigious and oldest and certainly friendliest rotary's in wichita, may be bigger he said, keep it short. these people around the lunch break. [laughter] but i did hear an awful lot. i'm glad to hear you guys don't sign each other. sure did not know how to keep the short. i think some of you in toward that. he was a faithful rotarian for more than 50 years. this was his club. he joined in 1950, and you can usually find in here without fail on monday. if he was out of town they often made it a point to visit with the rotary clubs like we have today. different cities in the united states. they claim -- it became clear. i have two books of features. he gave an awful lot of speeches her
jfk laid at rest at his home in massachusetts. paul fuqua was a part-time tour guide at arlington house. it sits atop a hill overlooking the cemetery. one day paul fuqua had an unexpected visitor. >> it was late afternoon early evening, and cars pulled up, and a gentlemen with head phones said the president is here. he said he and his friend were just driving around town looking at the city and looked up here, and he had never been here, so they thought they would come up here. and then we came out here and the city is incredible. >> the words kennedy spoke next would loom large. >> we paused a little bit longer, and he said this is so lovely, i could stay here forever. >> a friend with the president that day remembered those words. he told the family the story. soon paul fuqua has more vip visitors to scout it out. >> robert kennedy asked if that could be done? could that be a grave cite? and secretary mcnamara said yes, he could convert it to that use instantly. and so that was it. ♪ >> the day came. kings, queens, and leaders from around the world, joining the grieving widow,
's insurance fix and will not let insurers fix cancelled plans. they are joining massachusetts, new york and this is where the enrollment is going well so they don't want to disrupt that. >> bertha coombs, appreciate it. >>> coming up, a look at baltimore's leaky infrastructure and the money being washed away with it as mission critical, fixing american cities continues. >>> google is coming out with something new. they will offer a prepaid debit card so you can pay at stores and withdrawal cash from atms. it's called the wallet card because it's tied to a smart phone app that works like paypal. the card will be free with no monthly or annual fees. >>> shares of tesla have taken a pounding after a series of battery fires but owners of tesla still love their cars and a new consumererer port says tesla model s received the highest customer satisfaction rating of any car the magazine surveys in years with owners giving the score 99 out of 100. >> wow. >>> all this week nbr looked at troubled finances of big american cities. today, we looked at baltimore plagued by leaks, not leaks of inform
. >>> the massachusetts high school student accused of killing his math teamer has been indated. prosecutors charged 14-year-old phillip chisliip chism. he stole her credit cards, underwear, and phone. ke had previously pleaded not guilty to murder charges. >>> kennedy cousin skakel woke up a free man for the first time in 11 years. he faces a possible retrial in the 1975 murder of his neighbor martha moxley. last month the judge ruled he was not properly represented in his original trial. >>> and overseas, a man and a woman who were arrested on charges who held three women as virtual slaves for decades are free on bail. the women were rescued from a house in london and are said to be doing remarkably well under the circumstances. mark phillips reports. >> reporter: police said they moved in on a house in london after they discovered a tip that three women had been held there against their will for 30 years. a woman's protection charity arranged for the escape and the police arrested an m and a woman both in their 60s. the trapped women had apparently been allowed out occasionally but only under strict
programs like medicare part d come and the massachusetts help reform that was obamacare's predecessor. most people tend to sign up for coverage closer deadlines, so that is what the administration hopes will vindicate them after the first month, which did not go well. host: but if the deadline is not until march, why were expectations so high to begin with? people do not have to sign up until later. guest: that is right here at march is a key deadline because it is obviously the end of a six-month enrollment period. the other date is december 15, which is when people choose plans if they want them to kick in in january. there are a lot of people losing their coverage right now and they're going to want to remain insured, and for them, the middle of december is the crucial deadline. the reason that that is tough for the administration is it comes only two weeks after the deadline, where they say they're going to have the website fix, which is the end of this month, so if they cannot have healthcare.gov up and running, functioning enough for millions of people to actually buy their health pla
*eus ago in massachusetts -- two days ago in massachusetts saying it is a pretty popular plan, they reined in the cost. it worked for massachusetts, why not the country? >> this is government trying to put this in practice. when is the last time you went to d.m.v.? you happy with that experience? now for health care you've got to go through the same mish. you've had the series of rolling crises. the rollout a disaster. you've got the upcoming cancellation probably of employer-provided policies. and now looming just out there, just ahead you've got a doctor crisis. >> what do you mean by a doctor crisis? >> doctors are fleeing anything to do with medicare, medicaid and the obama exchanges. >> why? >> because they are not being paid properly. hospitals are not being paid properly. medicare is going to lose $700 billion. doctors are swamped with new paper work, new rules, new regulations, and they've got absolutely no protection whatsoever from lawsuits. they predict 90,000 doctor shortage. 90,000 within six years. 90,000 doctors short. >> you know what? on some exchanges they don't even list
the word. it comes from another massachusetts scholar penny adams and from the wonderful education. adams said basically was that when lincoln and the others got to washington in 1886 in the war began, no one knew what to do. they knew what the task was to be or when was headed for him. everyone without exception was to learn his business at the cost of the public. indianindeed, stewart and the os could be of no help to the young man seeking education. their education was to cost a million lives, not quite a million but close enough and $10 million more or less north and south before the country could recover its ballot and movement. the history of that tragic war and the deaths it caused was recounted in brilliant form by our current speaker as with great pleasure i invite the president of harvard university, doctor faust to join us. [applause] >> thank you so much for that very generous introduction, professor weinstein and all of you for being here tonight. it's a great pleasure and honor for me to talk for the first time its publication yesterday about this book, because so much of th
part of a massive storm system, that stretches from texas to massachusetts hurtling eastward bringing high winds and leaving a trail of damage. tornadoes reported in arkansas and southern illinois. in austin, texas. yesterday, we saw over a hundred water rescues. you can see they are struggling to get the bus out of the river. one thing we learned today, all school kids in the state of kansas are required to practice bus evacuation drills. and we're told that in this case, it might have saved lives. david. >> clayton, thanks to you. brave school children, abc meteorologist ginger zee tracking all of this. since this time last night. you say we might be dealing with flurries behind it. >> yes. behind the cold front that did this. let me show you, more than 300 severe weather reports for really much of the nation. you see some of them focused in the northeast and tennessee valley, southern indiana, a lot of wind damage. but behind it, watch this low pressure system, it travels up to the northeast, into canada and behind comes chilly air. not only chilly like detroit in the 40s throughou
some of it with you today. but i also bring greetings from medford massachusetts rotary, which is medford is about five miles north of boston. as it turned out its population is about 55,000, and when i was writing this book i sublease a 10 by 10 office space from a local architect who was, in fact, a one term rotary president and now he is signing up for a second term. he told me before game i told him us coming to speak to one of the most prestigious and oldest and certainly friendliest i know rhodri's in wichita may be bigger, he said keep it short. these people are on their lunch break. [laughter] but i did hear an awful lot and i'm glad you guys don't -- willard garvey didn't know how to keep it short. i think some of you enjoy that as well. but he was a faithful rotarian for more than 50 years, and this was his club. he joined rotary in 1950 and you could usually find in your without fail on monday. he was out of tow town and he on made it a point to visit with other rotary clubs like we had today. and around different cities in the united states. willard really loved rot
the national average. for example, new hampshire was 30% above the national average. massachusetts was 43%, maine, 67%, and florida, 68%. unfortunately those living in these and many other states can expect to see higher prices once again this winter, and this is precisely why we are bringing to the floor h.r. 1900. h.r. 1900 simply would bring certainty and agency accountability to the natural gas pipeline permitting process. it would allow natural gas pipelines to be built in a safe, responsible, and timely manner. it would also make existing natural gas pipelines safer. during the legislative hearing on h.r. 1900, we heard testimony from industry of a corrosive natural gas pipeline that could not be replaced in a timely manner because an agency missed the deadline to issue a permit by nearly a year. the american people demand better than this. and so as we hear discussion and consider amendments to h.r. 1900, i want to thank once again the members of the subcommittee, the staffs, and representative pompeo for all the work on this important legislation. i respectfully reserve the balanc
at massachusetts, which under governor romney introduced health care reform plan very similar to what the president is introduced here and in their first month of enrollment only 123 people enrolled for premium paying plans in massachusetts. they had massive enrollment toward the end of the enrollment period. we always expected enrollment figures to be low. we were saying that before october 1st, obviously the website problems have made it worse but that's why we're working every day because the website is just a means to an end. the end here is getting affordable health insurance to americans who haven't had it in the past. >> the administration has called in experts from google and other tech giants to help fix the obama care website and say the site should be fixed by the end of november. >>> here is something for you to consider if you're going over open enrollment options for your health insurance. the obama administration is loosening rules covering flexible spending accounts. cnn's christine romans joins us from new york with more. good morning, clis teen. christine. >> good morning, carol.
of enrollment in the first month of massachusetts as well. that is all excuse-making from my point of view because the rollout has been disasterous. jon: the rollout has been disasterous, and, charlie, we're starting to see some of the consequences of implementation of obamacare. people who listened to the president's promise about keeping your health plan if you liked it and now they're finding you can't. >> yeah. you know, listening to some of this hearing people like senator pat roberts from kansas, these are not highly partisan, they're conservatives but these are not highly partisan senators. and they are, they are unleashed on kathleen sebelius and i think it is because the, it has become very, is a very mainstream sort of complaint to want to pull your hair out over this and i think it is quite frankly what we saw in virginia where ken cuccinelli, closed that gap from a solid double-digit, you know, behind, to bring it to within a couple of points? i can't help but think, a lot of that has to do with, just absolute rage among independents and even probably a lot of democrats over wh
into place, who was behind them and what do they say? introduced by senator ed markey of massachusetts. he just joined this year. he is one of the leading clean energy advocates on capitol hill. he cosponsored the climate change bill in 2009 with waxman, he has been planning he wanted this to be his first legislation in the senate. it says electric utilities have to provide 25% of their electricity from renewable solar, -- wind., geothermal, by 2020 five. electric utilities and natural gas have to meet efficiency targets within a period. the second was introduced by tom udall and mike udall. their first cousins, they had a similar bill, 25% by 2025 renewable energy requirement, i don't believe they had the efficiency with theirs. the raf -- ref is popular at the state level. ranging fromevels 15% to 25% over the next decade or decade and a half. it is popular among clean energy advocates and environmentalists, it does not have a lot of chance of gaining traction in this congress. republicans are in charge of the house, they're very resistant to any sort of mandate, that is what an ref is.
is a graduate of dartmouth college and a phd candidate of political science at the massachusetts institute of technology. also with us is christopher preble. before joining cato institute in 2003, he taught school at st. cloud university. he was also the commissions officer in the u.s. navy. holds a phd in history from temple university. now i will turn things over to ben. thanks, everybody, for coming. i will talk about the historical part of this. if you are interested in the policy part, you can take a net - nap and wake up for chris' section. u.s.rgument is that security does not require a triad of nuclear delivery submarine-bm's, launched ballistic missiles, and bombers. in fact, we should only keep a small amount of submarine missiles. for a think tank paper, this is an historical argument, especially its attention to the and hows about the u.s. we justify nuclear weapons. we show in the paper the triad was a result of competition both with the soviet union and among the u.s. military services. the reasons we hear for the triad are more rationale than justifications rather than cause
disfunctional. he says the federal government isn't as bad as christie suggests. >>> the massachusetts state governor who got released has decided to retire. sergeant sean murphy insisting he was not forced out but it was time to move on. he'll receive a full pension. membrane's decision coming after internal charges against him for violating departmental rules were upheld. >>> the nfl is trying to get the full story of what happened between jonathan martin and richie incognito. martin left the team after alleged bullying by inincognito. we get more from cnn's john va is zarrella. >> reporter: the muscles teddy bear as a friend described incognito looked slick to have a brand-new ferrari delivered to his home while inside the training facility, incognito's teammates and coaches faced a barrage of questions off allegations of bullying. philbin saying incognito was tied to toughen up. >> since the day i walked through these doors has been one of honesty, respect, and accountability to one another. >> reporter: the nfl is investigating incognito's purportedly profanity laced e-mails for jonatha
of the state's rejecting his proposal are blue states. they include new york, massachusetts, washington, ryland, and vermont. another obamacare embarrassment for help secretary kathleen subereous just two days after cameras caught are witnessing health care crash right in front of her eyes. we are learning that the website is a bust in her home state of kansas. just 371 people have signed up for coverage in kansas. and walmart blue cross blue shield doing its best to taken advantage of the websites failure. take a look at their new ad. >> things don't always work like they are supposed to. good thing the government exchange website is that the only place to buy health insurance. lou: it is a bitter pill for the president to swallow, even the liberal media now seems to have had enough of obamacare. time magazine's newest cover says it all with a headline and a broken promise, what it means for this presidency. it is unlikely this will help turn around the president's 37 percent approval rating. >> congressman corey gardner, a member of the energy and commerce committee and subcommittee on oversi
storm system, that stretches from texas to massachusetts hurtling eastward bringing high winds and leaving a trail of damage. tornadoes reported in arkansas and southern illinois. in austin texas, yesterday we saw over a hundred water rescues. you can see they are struggling to get the bus out of the river. one thing we learned today, all school kids in the state of kansas are required to practice bus evacuation drills. and we're told that in this case, it might have saved lives. david. >> clayton, thanks to you. brave school children, abc meteorologist tracking all of this. you say we might be dealing with flurries behind it. >> yes. behind the cold front that did this. more than 300 severe weather reports for really much of the nation. you see some of them focused in the northeast and tennessee valley, southern indiana, a lot of wind damage. but behind it, watch this low pressure system, it travels up to the northeast, into canada and behind comes chilly air. not only chilly like detroit in the 40s throughout the weekend but you see snowflakes around the makes, syracuse, pitt
they used legislative ledger domain on december 24 before scott brown from massachusetts could take office to pass an immigration bill that -- pass a health care bill that the american people overwhelmingly opposed. maybe the american people, part of the frustration with the congress is they passed a bill without a single republican vote in the house or the senate, rammed it through, that the american people opposed. maybe that's why the american people are not happy with us around here. but let me explain, colleagues, what it is that's causing the greatest frustration in the senate. it's a trend that began some years ago, not long after i came to the senate 17 years ago, and it's just accelerated. and it's reached a pace on the majority leader reid we've never ever seen before, and it undermines the very integrity and tradition of the senate, and it's got to stop. and we've got to recover the tradition of this body. we owe it to those who will be filling these seats years to come. and this is the problem. a maneuver was discovered called filling the tree, a parliamentary maneuver that the
. ronald reagan, hell, won in massachusetts. it seems to me, larry, chris christie is a republican who understands that you've got to parachute behind enemy lines and take back some of the blue states or the gop just ain't going to win another presidential election. your take. >> of course that's correct. i mean, they have to do something to win blue states. maybe they start with the purple ones. frankly, larry, like virginia, which is, after all, the closest to the national average presidentially now for both 2008 and 2012. hey, if you can't win virginia back, you're not going to win the white house back. so, the republicans really do have to follow the christie model, even if they don't agree with all of christie's positions. they have to find people who talk blue. you know, there are other people out there, like scott walker, governor of wisconsin, he's won in a blue state and he talks blue. >> john kasich knows how to talk blue. there's a whole bunch of them. in this respect, i think christie is a path-breaker. karen finney, dick, you're great. that's it for this show. lots of twit
being a part of the administration. i couldn't. i was writing my book, living in massachusetts. it was more to stay friendship with the speechwriters. and a friendship with president obama. >> what should the public know about historians' relationships with presidents? >> i am not sure i feel able to write about a koran president. i like the distance -- current president. i like the distance. the only one i ever knew that i wrote about was lyndon johnson. it presented all these turbulent problems because i knew the guy. i certainly couldn't have done it until after he died. ever since that, it started everything. i wouldn't be a presidential historian without that wonderful character. nonetheless, i feel more writing from the treasures and diaries back 100 years ago. kennedy, a historian from stamford says, it was almost as if he was writing his own history book about himself. >> i think he thinks about that. these presidents inevitably do now. as soon as they get into office, and people are talking about, where is he going to rank? they start thinking that way. he especially h
in concord, massachusetts. so it was more a friendship of the speech writers and the friendship with president obama. >> what should the public know about historians' relationships with president s? >> the interesting thing is i'm not sure i'd feel able to write about a current president because i like the distance that the time -- the only one i ever wrote about that i knew was lincoln johnson. that presented all of the turbulent problems. i knew the guy. how much of what he told me could i talk about? i couldn't have done it until after he died. but every since that, even though i'm so grateful to my relationship to lbj, it started everything. i wouldn't have been a presidential historian without that incredibly wonderful character. nonetheless, i feel more comfortable not trading on what i know from the people now and rather writing from the treasures and the diaries back 100 years ago. i don't think i could write about a current president. >> david kennedy, historian from stanford in this piece, it was almost like he was writing his own history book about himself. >> i think
massachusetts. ms. warren: i ask that the quorum be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. warren: mr. president, i rise today to talk about the retirement cries in this country, a crisis at that has received far too little attention and far too little response from washington. i spent most of my career studying the economic pressures on middle-class families, families who worked hard, who played by the rules, but who still found themselves just hanging on by their fingernails. starting in the 1970's, even as workers became more productive, their wages flattened out, while things like health care and sending their kid to college kept going up. workers rolled up their slieiv , sent both pairptses into the workforce. that meant higher child care costs, a second car and higher taxes. they just tightened their belts more cutting spending wherever they could. adjusted for inflation, families spend less than they did a generation ago on food, clothing, furniture, appliances and other flexible purchases. when that still wasn't enough to cover rising costs, they took on debt, cree
fan. >> that is correct. >> very important. thank you. >>> 46 minutes past the hour. >>> massachusetts high school football team will remain off the field for the rest of the season. the school board in lunenberg is backing the superintendent who forfeited the remaining games after a racial slur was found on the foundation after 13-year-old's home. isaac phillips is a member of that football team. his mother is white. father is black. now his family says isaac doesn't want to go back to school and they are convinced it was a member of the team who wrote that slur. >> i feel horrible for, you know, the kids that are not involved but we are a small town. things like this shouldn't happen in a small community like ours. so when it does, i think it's time for drastic measures, canceling the football season, i think that will flush whoever that it is that is responsible for this to step forward. >> yes, it. . the superintendent plans to release more information about this investigation into who may have been responsible. that's the way to handle a situation like that, right? >>> 47 minutes
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